Tuesday, 20 December 2011

Objective Proficiency p 81. Vocabulary

Ex 3
  • Haven: /ˈheɪvn/ a place that is safe and peaceful where people or animals are protected. E.g. The hotel is a haven of peace and tranquility. The river banks are a haven for wildlife. The camp offers a haven to refugees.
  • Hoard: /hɔːd/ to collect and keep large amounts of food, money, etc, especially secretly.
  • Conversely: /ˈkɒnvɜːsli /in a way that is the opposite or reverse of something. En cambio, a la inversa. E.g. You can add the fluid to the powder, or, conversely, the powder to the fluid. Women suffering from anorexia /ˌænəˈreksiə/ are still convinced that their thin, frail bodies are fat and unsightly (ugly). Conversely, some people who are a great deal heavier than they should be can persuade themselves that they are ‘just right’.
  • Pride of place: the position in which something is most easily seen, that is given to the most important thing in a particular group. Puesto de honor. E.g. The photo was given pride of place on the mantelpiece.
  • Prominent: easily seen. E.g. The church tower was a prominent feature in the landscape. The story was given a prominent position on the front page. 
  • In jeopardy: /ˈdʒepədi/ in a dangerous position or situation and likely to be lost or harmed. E.g. The civil war has put thousands of lives in jeopardy. The future of the school and 50 jobs are in jeopardy.
Ex 4
  • Accommodating: /əˈkɒmədeɪtɪŋ/ willing to help and do things for other people. Obliging /əˈblaɪdʒɪŋ/. Complaciente. E.g. They are very accommodating to foreign visitors. David was gentle, generous and accommodating to a fault (a lot or even too much) 
  • Hold/keep something in check: to keep something under control so that it does not spread or get worse. E.g. Maggie managed to keep her temper in check. The epidemic was held in check by widespread vaccination.
Ex 5
KEY
a correct



b wrong- opinionated people have a lot to say on every subject, whether they know what they are talking about or not



c correct



d wrong- vivacious people are lively and excitable



e wrong- acquisitive people hoard things
Acquisitive: /əˈkwɪzətɪv/ wanting very much to buy or get new possessions. Sp. Codicioso. E.g. the post-war acquisitive society. It is an acquisitive company looking for ways to expand.



f correct




Meticulous: /məˈtɪkjələs/



g wrong- discriminating people have good taste 


Discriminating: /dɪˈskrɪmɪneɪtɪŋ/ able to judge the good quality of something. Discerning. E.g. a discriminating audience/customer.



h wrong - complacent people see no need for change even if needed.


Complacent: / kəmˈpleɪsnt/ too satisfied with yourself or with a situation, so that you do not feel that any change is necessary; showing or feeling complacency. Sp. Satisfecho. E.g. a dangerously complacent attitude to the increase in unemployment. We must not become complacent about progress. 
Accommodating: /əˈkɒmədeɪtɪŋ/ willing to help and do things for other people. Obliging /əˈblaɪdʒɪŋ/. Sp. Complaciente. E.g. They are very accommodating to foreign visitors. David was gentle, generous and accommodating to a fault (a lot or even too much).



i wrong- unobtrusive people like to remain in the background
Unobtrusive: /ˌʌnəbˈtruːsɪv/not attracting unnecessary attention. Sp. Discreto. E.g. The service at the hotel is efficient and unobtrusive.



j wrong- manipulative people like to control people.



Manipulative: /məˈnɪpjələtɪv/



k correct 

More vocabulary:
simplistic: shallow and not given to analysis. Treating something in a way that makes it seem much simpler than it really is. E.g. a simplistic analysis of the issue.


No comments:

Post a Comment