Friday, 9 December 2011

Objective Proficiency p 70. Idiom Spot. Extra Key Word Transformations

1. All the children ran away and didn't help Billy to take the blame for the broken window.
HIGH
All the children ran away and  ___________________ to take the blame for the broken window.
2.   His life had been at risk in the hospital, but he had eventually recovered.
GO
 It ____________________________ in the hospital, but he had eventually recovered.
3. He was forced to apologize and publicly admit his error. 
PIE
He ___________________________and publicly admit his error. 
4. I wanted it to be a surprise, but my sister let the cat out of the bag.
BEANS
I wanted it to be a surprise, but my sister __________________________. 
5. The opportunity was completely unexpected.
BLUE
The opportunity ___________________________. 
6. What a restaurant - the food was extremely good!
WORLD
What a restaurant - the food _____________________!  
7. To make a long story short, we lost the case. 
NUTSHELL
To _____________________, we lost the case. 
8. It was a good interview and I thought I was certain to get the job.
BAG
It was a good interview and I thought the job________________.
9. They had a lucky break with their second album which became an immediate best-seller.
STRUCK
They _____________________ their second album which became an immediate best-seller.
10. Speculation over a larger screen iPhone is clearly having an enthusiastic response from consumers.
CHORD
Speculation over a larger screen iPhone is clearly _______________________ consumers.
11. Some investors have made large profits investing in airlines. 
GOLD
Some investors ____________________ investing in airlines. 
12. I had a fifty dollar bill that I was very eager to spend, so I figured I'd go out and have a really good time.
HOLE
I had a fifty dollar bill that was __________________________, so I figured I'd go out and have a really good time.  
13. I have a big exam tomorrow so I'll stay until late tonight.
OIL
I have a big exam tomorrow so I'll be __________________________ tonight.
14. Several art dealers lost a lot of money on old master paintings that later turned out to be fakes.
FINGERS
Several art dealers got _____________________ on old master paintings that later turned out to be fakes.  
15.  He must have been unkindly talked about since the corruption scandal came to light.
EARS
_____________________________ since the corruption scandal came to light. 
16. Christine's new boyfriend seems to be very rich. He's always buying her extravagant gifts.
BURN
Christine's new boyfriend seems to _____________________. He's always buying her extravagant gifts.  
17.I had no possibility of returning to my previous employer since I publicly criticized their products.
BOATS
I'd already _________________________ my previous employer by publicly criticizing their products.  
18. She'd been going to bed late and getting up early studying for her exams and made herself ill.
CANDLE
She'd been _______________________ studying for her exams and made herself ill.  


KEY
1. All the children ran away and left Billy high and dry to take the blame for the broken window.  
High and dry: in a difficult or unpleasant situation that they cannot escape from, without help or money. To leave someone unsupported and unable to maneuver; to leave someone helpless. E.g. All my workers quit and left me high and dry. By switching to cheaper overseas suppliers they have left us high and dry. 



2.  It had been touch-and-go for him in the hospital, but he had eventually recovered. 
Touch and go: critical, risky. Not certain and with a risk of death or serious failure. Used to say that the result of a situation is uncertain and that there is a possibility that something bad or unpleasant will happen. E.g. She's fine now, but it was touch-and-go for a while (= there was a possibility that she might die). It was touch-and-go whether they'd allow him into the country or not.



3. He had to eat humble pie and publicly admit his error. 
Eat humble pie: To say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made. To admit that you were wrong about something. Make a humble apology and accept humiliation. E.g. he will have to eat humble pie at training after being sent off for punching



4. I wanted it to be a surprise, but my sister spilled/ spilt the beans. 
Spill the beans: to tell somebody something that should be kept secret or private. E.g. So who spilled the beans about her affair with David? It was then that she threatened to spill the beans about her affair with the president. My husband was afraid to spill the beans about the cost of his purchases. 



5. The opportunity came (completely) out of the blue.
Out of the blue: unexpectedly; without warning. E.g. The decision came out of the blue. One day, out of the blue, she announced that she was leaving.



6. What a restaurant - the food was out of this world!
Out of this world: (informal) used to emphasize how good, beautiful, etc. something is. E.g. The meal was out of this world. The skiing and the mountains were just out of this world!



7. To put it in a nutshell, we lost the case.
(Put something) in a nutshell: (to say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words. In essence. Briefly. Concisely. E.g. To put it in a nutshell, we're bankrupt. Just give me the facts in a nutshell. Well, to put it in a nutshell, we're lost.



8. It was a good interview and I thought the job was in the bag.
Be in the bag: (informal) if something is in the bag, it is almost certain to be won or achieved. (Someone who hunts puts what they have killed in a bag). E.g. The election is in the bag unless the voters find out about my past. Once we'd scored the third goal, the match was pretty much in the bag. Nobody knows who'll get the job, despite rumours that Keating has it in the bag.



9. They struck (it) lucky with their second album which became an immediate best-seller.
Strike (it) lucky: (informalto suddenly and unexpectedly have some good luck.  E.g. We certainly struck it lucky with the weather. What would you do if you struck it lucky in the national lottery? After years as a struggling businessman he struck it lucky.



10. Speculation over a larger screen iPhone is clearly striking a chord with consumers
Strike/touch a chord (with somebody): to say or do something that makes people feel sympathy or enthusiasm. E.g. The speaker had obviously struck a chord with his audience. The party's policy on childcare facilities has struck a responsive chord with women voters. Her speech struck a sympathetic chord among business leaders. This writer strikes a chord with young women.

responsive (to somebody/something) reacting with interest or enthusiasm. E.g. The club is responsive to new ideas. A responsive and enthusiastic audience.



11. Some investors have struck gold investing in airlines. 
Strike gold: to find or do something that brings you a lot of success or money. E.g. He has struck gold with his latest novel. A few lucky people have struck gold by investing in this company.



12. I had a fifty dollar bill that was burning a hole in my pocket, so I figured I'd go out and have a really good time. 
Burn a hole in your pocket: if money burns a hole in your pocket, you want to spend it as soon as you have it. His inheritance was burning a hole in his pocket. Money burns a hole in your pocket.


13. I have a big exam tomorrow so I'll be burning the midnight oil tonight

Burn the midnight oil: to study or work until late at night. E.g. If you burn the midnight oil night after night, you'll probably become ill.



14. Several art dealers got their fingers burnt/burned on old master paintings that later turned out to be fakes.
Burn your fingers/ get your fingers burnt: to suffer as a result of doing something without realizing the possible bad results, especially in business. E.g. He got his fingers badly burnt taking part in the stock market.



15. His ears must have been burning since the corruption scandal came to light.
Somebody's ears are burning: a person thinks that other people are talking about them, especially in an unkind way.E.g.‘I bumped into your ex-wife last night.’ ‘I thought I could feel my ears burning!’



16. Christine's new boyfriend seems to have money to burn. He's always buying her extravagant gifts.
Have money to burn: to have so much money that you do not have to be careful with it. E.g. Even though they had money to burn, she didn't really enjoy spending it.  I don't know what her job is but she certainly seems to have money to burn.



17. I'd already burned my boats with my previous employer by publicly criticizing their products.
Burn your bridges/ burn your boats to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.



18. She'd been burning the candle at both ends studying for her exams and made herself ill.
burn the candle at both ends to work or do other things from early in the morning until late at night and so get very little rest. To work very hard and stay up very late at night. (One end of the candle is work done in the daylight, and the other end is work done at night.) E.g. No wonder Mary is ill. She has been burning the candle at both ends for a long time. You'll wear out if you keep burning the candle at both ends.  I'm busy trying to get ready for the holidays and burning the candle at both ends.

No comments:

Post a Comment