Friday, 9 December 2011

Objective Proficiency p 70. Three People Discuss Where They Live. Listening

Fill in the gaps with a word or phrase.
1. The three guests will embark on a new lifeplan that will cause a change of _____ for all three of them.
2. Sally's parents decided to go their __________________.
3. For Meg at the beginning, winding down was a ______________.
4. Most people of Sally's age  just hang around the ____________ or go to each other's houses.
5. The country ____________is not such good news for Sally.
6. Meg still gets a _________ out of the sheer beauty and calm that surrounds them.
7. Kevin thinks he was lucky and Sally agrees that it was pretty ___________.
8. Meg had a real ______________ and she decided to swap her house.
9. Kevin's girlfriend __________ him a month ago. 
10 Kevin wants to get out of London for a while but not burn his ______ completely.
11. Kevin is plannig to write a ________ paperback on city ________.
12. The interviewer is concerned it might be potentially ______________ for Sally since she will have to change her school.
13. Sally is not worried because if things do not ___________, she can move in with her dad.
14. The interviewer feels that they have things pretty much _______________.


KEY
1. gear
Embark on/upon something: /ɪmˈbɑːk/ to start to do something new or difficult. Sp. Emprender. E.g. She is about to embark on a diplomatic career. Remember these basic rules before embarking upon major home improvements.


2. separate ways
Go your separate ways: 1 to end a relationship with somebody. E.g. When the business was sold they went their separate ways. 2 to go in a different direction from somebody you have been travelling with.


3. godsend
Wind down: /waɪnd/ to rest or relax after a period of activity or excitement.
Godsend: something good that happens unexpectedly and helps somebody/something when they need help. E.g. This new benefit has come as a godsend for low-income families.


4. village green
Hang around: to wait or stay near a place, not doing very much. E.g. You hang around here in case he comes, and I'll go on ahead. 
Green: an area of grass, especially in the middle of a town or village. E.g. Children were playing on the village green.


5. Idyll
Idyll: /ˈɪdɪl/ /ˈaɪdl/ a happy and peaceful place, event or experience, especially one connected with the countryside.


6. rush
Rush: a sudden feeling of extreme pleasure or excitement. E.g. Parachuting will give you the rush of a lifetime.


7. Flukey (or fluky)
Flukey (also fluky) /ˈfluːki/ a lucky or unusual thing that happens by accident, not because of planning or skill. Sp. Chiripa.


8. Brainwave
Brainwave: a sudden good idea. E.g. I've had a brainwave!


9. dumped
Dump sb.: to end a romantic relationship with somebody. E.g. Did you hear he's dumped his girlfriend?


10. boats
Burn your bridges (also burn your boats): to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.


11. racy
Racy: having a style that is exciting and amusing, sometimes in a way that is connected with sex. Sp. Animado, subido de tono. E.g. A racy novel.


slickers
City slicker: a person who behaves in a way that is typical of people who live in big cities. Sp. Urbanita.


12 disruptive



13 pan out
Pan out: to develop in a particular way. Dar resultado. E.g. I'm happy with the way things have panned out.


14. sorted out

Vocabulary

  • Embark on/upon something: /ɪmˈbɑːk/ to start to do something new or difficult. Sp. Emprender. E.g. She is about to embark on a diplomatic career. Remember these basic rules before embarking upon major home improvements.
  • Bring sth aboutto make something happen. Cause. E.g. What brought about the change in his attitude?
  • Head: to move in a particular direction. E.g. Where are we heading? Where are you two headed? Let's head back home. She headed for the door. We headed north. Head towards the mall. The boat was heading out to sea.
  • Go your separate ways: 1 to end a relationship with somebody. E.g. When the business was sold they went their separate ways. 2 to go in a different direction from somebody you have been travelling with.
  • Out of the blue: unexpectedly; without warning. E.g. The decision came out of the blue.
  • Wind down: /waɪnd/ to rest or relax after a period of activity or excitement.
  • Godsend: something good that happens unexpectedly and helps somebody/something when they need help. E.g. This new benefit has come as a godsend for low-income families. 
  • Hang around: to wait or stay near a place, not doing very much. E.g. You hang around here in case he comes, and I'll go on ahead. 
  • Green: an area of grass, especially in the middle of a town or village. E.g. Children were playing on the village green. 
  • Idyll: /ˈɪdɪl/ /ˈaɪdl/ a happy and peaceful place, event or experience, especially one connected with the countryside.
  • Pin sth down: to explain or understand something exactly. E.g. The cause of the disease is difficult to pin down precisely. 
  • Rush: a sudden feeling of extreme pleasure or excitement. E.g. Parachuting will give you the rush of a lifetime.
  • Be out of the frame: not possible.
  • Break: an opportunity to do something, usually to get something that you want or to achieve success. E.g. I got my lucky break when I won a ‘Young Journalist of the Year’ competition. We've had a few bad breaks (= pieces of bad luck) along the way. If you just give me a break, you won't regret it. 
  • Flukey (also fluky) /ˈfluːki/ a lucky or unusual thing that happens by accident, not because of planning or skill. Sp. Chiripa. 
  • Brainwave: a sudden good idea. E.g. I've had a brainwave! 
  • Track somebody/something down: to find somebody/something after searching in several different places. Trace. E.g. The police have so far failed to track down the attacker. I finally tracked the reference down in a book of quotations.
  • Fall/slot into place: if something complicated or difficult to understand falls or slots into place, it becomes organized or clear in your mind. Sp. Encajar. E.g. Then I found his diary and it all began to fall into place.
  • High-profile: receiving or involving a lot of attention and discussion on television, in newspapers, etc. Sp. Destacado, prominente, notable. E.g. a high-profile campaign.
  • Dump sb.: to end a romantic relationship with somebody. E.g. Did you hear he's dumped his girlfriend?
  • (Not) a bed of roses: (not) an easy or a pleasant situation. E.g. Their life together hasn't exactly been a bed of roses.
  • Burn your bridges (also burn your boats): to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.
  • (Put something) in a nutshell: (to say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words. E.g. To put it in a nutshell, we're bankrupt.
  • Racy: having a style that is exciting and amusing, sometimes in a way that is connected with sex. Sp. Animado, subido de tono. E.g. A racy novel.
  • City slicker: a person who behaves in a way that is typical of people who live in big cities. Sp. Urbanita.
  • Draw on: to use a supply of something that is available to you. E.g. I'll have to draw on my savings. The novelist draws heavily on her personal experiences.
  • Pan out: to develop in a particular way. Dar resultado. E.g. I'm happy with the way things have panned out.
  • On: on duty; working. E.g. I'm on now till 8 tomorrow morning.
  • The best of both/all possible worlds: the benefits of two or more completely different situations that you can enjoy at the same time. E.g. If you enjoy the coast and the country, you'll get the best of both worlds on this walk.

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