Friday, 9 December 2011

Objective Proficiency p 70. Keys and Vocabulary

Ex 1
  • The grass is (always) greener on the other side (of the fence): (saying) said about people who never seem happy with what they have and always think that other people have a better situation than they have.
Ex 2
  • Embark on/upon something: /ɪmˈbɑːk/ to start to do something new or difficult. Emprender. E.g. She is about to embark on a diplomatic career. Remember these basic rules before embarking upon major home improvements.
  • Bring sth aboutto make something happen. Cause. E.g. What brought about the change in his attitude?
  • Head: to move in a particular direction. E.g. Where are we heading? Where are you two headed? Let's head back home. She headed for the door. We headed north. Head towards the mall. The boat was heading out to sea.
  • Go your separate ways: 1 to end a relationship with somebody. E.g. When the business was sold they went their separate ways. 2 to go in a different direction from somebody you have been travelling with.
  • Out of the blue: unexpectedly; without warning. E.g. The decision came out of the blue.
  • Wind down: /waɪnd/ to rest or relax after a period of activity or excitement.
  • Godsend: something good that happens unexpectedly and helps somebody/something when they need help. E.g. This new benefit has come as a godsend for low-income families. 
  • Hang around: to wait or stay near a place, not doing very much. E.g. You hang around here in case he comes, and I'll go on ahead. 
  • Green: an area of grass, especially in the middle of a town or village. E.g. Children were playing on the village green. 
  • Idyll: /ˈɪdɪl/ /ˈaɪdl/ a happy and peaceful place, event or experience, especially one connected with the countryside.
  • Pin sth down: to explain or understand something exactly. E.g. The cause of the disease is difficult to pin down precisely. 
  • Rush: a sudden feeling of extreme pleasure or excitement. E.g. Parachuting will give you the rush of a lifetime.
  • Be out of the frame: not possible.
  • Break: an opportunity to do something, usually to get something that you want or to achieve success. E.g. I got my lucky break when I won a ‘Young Journalist of the Year’ competition. We've had a few bad breaks (= pieces of bad luck) along the way. If you just give me a break, you won't regret it. 
  • Flukey (also fluky) /ˈfluːki/ a lucky or unusual thing that happens by accident, not because of planning or skill. Chiripa. 
  • Brainwave: a sudden good idea. E.g. I've had a brainwave! 
  • Track somebody/something down: to find somebody/something after searching in several different places. Trace. E.g. The police have so far failed to track down the attacker. I finally tracked the reference down in a book of quotations.
  • Fall/slot into place: if something complicated or difficult to understand falls or slots into place, it becomes organized or clear in your mind. Encajar. E.g. Then I found his diary and it all began to fall into place.
  • High-profile: receiving or involving a lot of attention and discussion on television, in newspapers, etc. Destacado, prominente, notable. E.g. a high-profile campaign.
  • Dump sb.: to end a romantic relationship with somebody. E.g. Did you hear he's dumped his girlfriend?
  • (Not) a bed of roses: (not) an easy or a pleasant situation. E.g. Their life together hasn't exactly been a bed of roses.
  • Burn your bridges (also burn your boats): to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.
  • (Put something) in a nutshell: (to say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words. E.g. To put it in a nutshell, we're bankrupt.
  • Racy: having a style that is exciting and amusing, sometimes in a way that is connected with sex. Animado, subido de tono. E.g. A racy novel.
  • City slicker: a person who behaves in a way that is typical of people who live in big cities. Urbanita.
  • Draw on: to use a supply of something that is available to you. E.g. I'll have to draw on my savings. The novelist draws heavily on her personal experiences.
  • Pan out: to develop in a particular way. Dar resultado. E.g. I'm happy with the way things have panned out.
  • On: on duty; working. E.g. I'm on now till 8 tomorrow morning.
  • The best of both/all possible worlds: the benefits of two or more completely different situations that you can enjoy at the same time. E.g. If you enjoy the coast and the country, you'll get the best of both worlds on this walk. 
Ex 3
KEY
a- 5 out of the blue
Out of the blue: unexpectedly; without warning. By chance. E.g. The decision came out of the blue.


b- 4 out of the frame
Be out of the frame: not possible, not involved in something, or not being considered for something. E.g. With Steve out of the frame, I knew I had a chance with Sarah.


c-6 life's not exactly a bed of roses
a bed of roses a luxurious situation; an easy and peaceful life. E.g. Who said life would be a bed of roses? If I had a million bucks, I would be in a bed of roses.


d-3 burn my boats completely
Burn your bridges (also burn your boats): to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.


e-2 in a nutshell
(Put something) in a nutshell: (to say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words. E.g. To put it in a nutshell, we're bankrupt.


f-1 the best of both worlds
The best of both/all possible worlds: the benefits of two or more completely different situations that you can enjoy at the same time. E.g. If you enjoy the coast and the country, you'll get the best of both worlds on this walk.

Idiom Spot
  • High and dry: in a difficult situation, without help or money.
  • Touch and go: used to say that the result of a situation is uncertain and that there is a possibility that something bad or unpleasant will happen. E.g. She's fine now, but it was touch-and-go for a while (= there was a possibility that she might die). It was touch-and-go whether they'd allow him into the country or not.
  • Eat humble pie: To say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made.
  • Spill the beans: to tell somebody something that should be kept secret or private. 
  • Out of the blue: unexpectedly; without warning. E.g. The decision came out of the blue.
  • Out of this world: (informal) used to emphasize how good, beautiful, etc. something is. E.g. The meal was out of this world.
  • (Put something) in a nutshell: (to say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words. E.g. To put it in a nutshell, we're bankrupt.
  • Be in the bag: (informal) if something is in the bag, it is almost certain to be won or achieved.
  • Strike (it) lucky: (informal) to have good luck. E.g. We certainly struck it lucky with the weather.
  • Strike/touch a chord (with somebody): to say or do something that makes people feel sympathy or enthusiasm. E.g. The speaker had obviously struck a chord with his audience.
  • Strike gold: to find or do something that brings you a lot of success or money. E.g. He has struck gold with his latest novel.
  • Burn a hole in your pocket: if money burns a hole in your pocket, you want to spend it as soon as you have it.
  • Burn the midnight oil: to study or work until late at night.
  • Burn your fingers/ get your fingers burnt: to suffer as a result of doing something without realizing the possible bad results, especially in business. E.g. He got his fingers badly burnt taking part in the stock market.
  • Somebody's ears are burning: a person thinks that other people are talking about them, especially in an unkind way.E.g.‘I bumped into your ex-wife last night.’ ‘I thought I could feel my ears burning!’
  • Have money to burn: to have so much money that you do not have to be careful with it.
  • Burn your bridges/ burn your boats to do something that makes it impossible to return to the previous situation later. E.g. Think carefully before you resign—you don't want to burn your bridges.
Ex 4
KEY
a taking



b in
in place: working or ready to work. E.g. All the arrangements are now in place for their visit. How long has the import ban been in place? We didn't have the systems in place to deal with so many orders.


c all over



d first



e out of 
dress down: to wear clothes that are more informal than those you usually wear, for example in an office. E.g. I dress down if I know I'm just going to be moving boxes of documents at work.


Ex 5
KEY
1 acronym



2 network
loosely in a way that is not exact. E.g. The two problems are only loosely related.


3 spaces



4 sector
embrace something (formal) to include something. E.g. The talks embraced a wide range of issues. The word ‘mankind’ embraces men, women and children.
reach out to somebody: to show somebody that you are interested in them and/ or want to help them. E.g. The church needs to find new ways of reaching out to young people. We are reaching out to the most vulnerable members of the community.
sectarian: /sekˈteəriən/ connected with the differences that exist between groups of people who have different religious views. E.g. sectarian attacks/ violence. Attempts to break down the sectarian divide in Northern Ireland.
undergo something to experience something, especially a change or something unpleasant. E.g. to undergo tests/ trials/ repairs. My mother underwent major surgery last year. Some children undergo a complete transformation when they become teenagers.



5 regeneration
junction: the place where two or more roads or railway/ railroad lines meet. E.g. It was near the junction of City Road and Old Street.



6 neighbourhood



7 demolition



8 consultation




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