Monday, 28 November 2011

Objective Proficiency p 59. Idiom Spot. Extra Key Word Transformation

1. One of the books on the top shelf attracted my interest, and I took it down to look at it.
EYE
One of the books on the top shelf __________________, and I took it down to look at it.
2.  I felt so embarrassed - I just couldn't look directly at him without fear or shame.
EYE
I felt so embarrassed - I just couldn't ______________________. 
3. Would you mind looking at my essay quickly and giving me your comments?
EYE
Would you mind _______________________my essay and giving me your comments? 
4.  He was good at noticing the unusual and the exotic which made him a very good shopping companion.
EYE
He ___________________ the unusual and the exotic which made him a very good shopping companion.   
5. Management often choose to ignore bullying in the workplace.
EYE
Management often ___________________ bullying in the workplace.  
6. My father and I agree on most things.
EYE
My father and I ___________________most things.  
7. Politicians are constantly visible to all.
EYE
Politicians find themselves constantly __________________.  


KEY
1. One of the books on the top shelf caught my eye, and I took it down to look at it. 
  • Catch somebody's eye: 1. if something catches your eye, you suddenly notice it. E.g. There was one painting that caught my eye.
    2. to attract somebody's attention. E.g. Can you catch the waiter's eye?



2. I felt so embarrassed - I just couldn't look him in the eye. 
  • look somebody in the eye(s)/face

    (usually used in negative sentences and questions) to look straight at somebody without feeling embarrassed or ashamed. E.g. Can you look me in the eye and tell me you're not lying? I'll never be able to look her in the face again!


3. Would you mind casting an eye over my essay and giving me your comments?
  • Cast/run an eye/your eyes over something: to look at or examine something quickly. Check. E.g. Could you just run your eyes over this report? 


4.  He had an eye for the unusual and the exotic which made him a very good shopping companion.
Have an eye for something: to be able to judge if things look attractive, valuable, etc. E.g. I've never had much of an eye for fashion. She has an eye for a bargain.  



5. Management often turn a blind eye to bullying in the workplace.
Turn a blind eye (to something): to pretend not to notice something bad that is happening, so you do not have to do anything about it. E.g. The authorities were either unaware of the problem or turned a blind eye to it.   



6. My father and I see eye to eye on/about most things
see eye to eye (about/on someone or something) (with someone) to agree about someone or something with someone else. E.g. I'm glad we see eye to eye about Todd with Mary. I see eye to eye with Mary. Will labour and management ever see eye to eye on the new contract?  



7. Politicians find themselves constantly in the public eye.  
  • in the public eye well known to many people through newspapers and television. E.g. She doesn't want her children growing up in the public eye.
 
  

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